Prepare to get sucked into night-long binges on these awesome websites dedicated to appealing toward photographers and artists. In the days of photography of yore, publishing photographs required a wealth of materials (and personal connections) to get an audience in front of your images. Nowadays, seeking inspiration in images you connect with is just a click away. Most of us already check Tumblr and Flickr obsessively. But it’s good to get off of these platforms periodically to dive deeper into what artists are gaining a certain popularity in the internet art world.

 

So, what photography websites stand out from the rest?

Government Archives

ex slaves african american experience in ohio

Tap and Susie Hawkins, married ex-slaves in Springfield, OH. Image from the Ohio History Connection

 

Prince Albert the Educated Horse with school children. Pay Streak Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition: Seattle 1909

Prince Albert the Educated Horse with school children. Pay Streak Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition: Seattle 1909

That’s right, our government is the best curator of them all. Photography has proven its power in this country; influencing journalism and the course of history. The government hosts a variety of archives on its site linking to a plethora of images. These range to collections of African-American history (as ex-slaves in Ohio, pictured above) to a large collection of images of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, publicizing the development of the Pacific Northwest and showcased the famously trained horse Albert.

 

Booooooom

Booooooom started as Canadian Jeff Hamada’s curation project in the 2008, in the early days of similar sites like Tumblr. It’s writers cull the best works from up-and-coming artists around the world, listed in easy-to-navigate categories. It’s fun to explore and my favorite section is of course, the photography section.

Photographer Spotlight by Jeff Hamada: Susan Worsham

Photographer Spotlight by Jeff Hamada: Susan Worsham

 

Lisa Bettany

When, Vancouverian Lisa was 21-years with Olympic dreams on the horizon, she suffered a life-altering figure skating accident. A close friend loaned Lisa a camera as a creative coping mechanism. Photography brought ignited her passion to heal and see the world. Her main site, lisabettany.com, displays her accomplishments since. She has been featured in Elle and Wired among many other publications. Her work is pretty impressive.

Mareen Fischinger

Mareen Fischinger is a great role model for anyone working on developing their professional portfolio. She’s deft at combining an aesthetic eye with the vocational requirements her job as a photographer demands. All while displaying it on an awesome site.

The Gordon Parks Foundation

Harlem Gang Leader, 1948. Gordon Parks, Gordon Parks Foundation

Harlem Gang Leader, 1948. Gordon Parks, Gordon Parks Foundation

A simple search is often enough to find a collection of influential works. The Gordon Parks Foundation permanently preserves the work on their website’s archive of Civil Rights era photographer, film director, and writer, Gordon Parks.

Weegee

Another site that’s out there is Weegee’s archive, although a bit dated and unofficial. The best opportunity to find Weegee’s work is when his pieces are featured in galleries, but he was truly a master of capturing New York City at its strangest. Worth a peek.

 

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