Brendan Taylor Filice

Photography & the Outdoors

Tag: Adventure

5 Tips for Becoming a Better, More Thoughtful Photographer| Brendan Taylor Filice

5 Tips for Becoming a Better, More Thoughtful Photographer

5 Tips for Becoming a Better, More Thoughtful Photographer| Brendan Taylor FiliceEarnestness, uncapped passion, and curiosity tend to produce incredible photos. The ability to point a lens at a person and capture their soul, or point it at an item and capture its presence is a skill that not everyone has, but it is something that every hopeful photographer can aspire to.

For some, photography is a just method by which they plug self-indulgent images and snapshots into various online networks, and for everyone else, photography is a visual art form. It’s a practice that’s realized through art and science, through the meaningful application of electromagnetic radiation and recorded light.

Photography is the ability to create durable images, and its existence services businesses, recreation, hobbies, communication, and the art, film, and video production industries. There are many ways you can inspire the creative photographer within, including discovering what things excite you and spark your creative juices.

Read a Book

Your first thought may be to pick up a photography book, and there’s nothing wrong with that. However, attempt to seek out all types of content. Regard images you read in poetry, fiction, non-fiction and comics, and imagine what that work would look like. Do this while considering some of the techniques you’ve come across when examining the word of the greats.

Go on an Adventure

The thought of capturing things close to home may seem boring or mundane, so go elsewhere. Pack your bags and go on a trip. Take a weekend trip upstate with your camera out. Walk rural or mountainous terrain with your eyes and camera scanning the horizon, and attempt to capture that unfiltered beauty with your camera. Do this early, when the light is brightest and can offer you crisp photos of scenery.

Edit, Edit, Edit

Don’t settle for a photo and say good enough. Instead, keep your eyes open and stay critical. If you find a flaw during your post-photography editing session, consider using a different image or crop it. Follow your strength and abandon weakness. Find what works for you, and walk that line closely. Always feel open to experimentation, but don’t be defined by momentarily laziness or mediocrity.

Submission

One you’ve developed some pride in your work, consider submitting to a publication or competition. There are countless opportunities available to aspiring photographers. Both publications and competitions can lead to compensation –meaning that you’d be a professional photographer!

Design a Photographic Project

Rather than absentmindedly snapping photos, design a year-long project where you can focus your attention. Of course, you can stray from this a do break away projects but create a content creation schedule for yourself that will allow you to hone your skills. If you’re interested in portraits, then set a plan to search for attractive faces and gather a collection. Experiment with location, with intention, with execute -but make sure that the photo set is cohesive. Another possible project: consider visiting the same place over a long period, and take a picture a different time of day, capturing the evolving mood of that setting.
There are some other things you can do to improve your skill, including looking at light, considering composition and form, learning your camera settings, playing with color temperature, and learning how to use great editing software, such as Lightroom. You can also visit with a community of other visual artists interested in critiquing and improving one another’s work. These tips will help to develop your photographic style and voice.

Go On A Photography Adventure Brendan Filice

Go On A Photography Adventure

photography adventure brendan filice

We take pictures to show the places where we’ve gone. We look at photography to explore our innermost dreams; the luxurious hotels we want to stay in one day, the mountains we want to climb, the creatures around the world we hope to see with our own eyes.

I encourage everyone to go on an adventure, inspired by photography itself. Your camera will be your guide. Your camera will be your compass. Prepare your gear, pick a destination (short term or long term) and commit to dedicated exploration of your subject through your lens.

  1. Prepare

You’ll want to be diligent in choosing your gear.  It may be difficult to choose which camera gear to travel with. No one wants to miss out on that perfect shot because didn’t pack the right lens, but you definitely don’t want to overpack.  When you are trekking across a the dewy field, every additional ounce will way you down and start to distract you when you’re trying to shoot. So when preparing gear, keep size and weight to the lightest possible. Remember, lightweight doesn’t mean poor quality. You can get cameras that can still focus and shoot great photos.

Just as important as choosing your camera and is choosing the location. If you’re lucky to have a lot of time to take for a vacation, and can go internationally, you can start exploring options by searching photography destinations on Flickr and 500px.  Check out the map features that display pictures at popular destinations.  Narrow down the spots you want to travel to, analyze the captions of the images, and connect with users to get more tips on the place. My best advice is get to know as much as you can before jetting off. Guide books and travel blogs are good to get a reference of the area, but I recommend reaching out to bloggers and even photographers who have taken the same trip. These people are your best resources.

2. Pack light, but don’t forget the necessities

We’ve all had that moment where we run out of batteries or lose charge. Pack light but remember essential accessories such as batteries and tripods. Carry equipment in a camera-specific bag with padded inserts. A waterproof cover is also smart to keep on hand. It’s fun to take long exposure shots when you’re traveling in the open wilderness, but you’ll need a tripod to hold your camera in place. There’s a lot of work going into new mirrorless cameras recently. These cameras are gaining in popularity because they provide dSLR-like performance in a lighter and more compact package. They literally ditch the “mirror” and images are recorded directly onto the digital sensor; cameras tend to be loaded with new technology, such as WiFi uploads and mobile phone connectivity.

3. Say “Yes”

Vacation is for sleeping in, but it’s also ideal for beautiful early morning light. The magic hour is a special way to photograph your new destination.  Don’t miss the golden light and long shadows at twilight.Take advantage of the night (if the weather’s right) by setting up your tripod and slowing your shutter speed in order to capture mountainous or desert landscapes lit by the blue moon. One special destination is in the northern hemisphere, Iceland for example, where you just may catch a glimpse of the aurora borealis. It’s worth the wait.

 

Brendan Filice is the author of The Defining Images of Photojournalism. Follow him on Twitter and Quora.